LOUISIANA IN THE CIVIL WAR

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SCOPE & CONTENT

The goal of Louisiana in the Civil War is to provide an online resource of information and links to our great state's involvement in the war. Topics expected to be commonly covered are: Battles fought in Louisiana, battles that Louisianians participated in, unit histories, rosters, uniforms and equipment of Louisiana soldiers, personalities to include not only the leadership of the state and armies but the common soldier, flags and resources to research/read on the state's role in the war.



Louisiana in the Civil War strongly supports the input of the Civil War community. Submissions of stories, information, etc. are welcome and full credit will be given for what we share.

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Bourbeaux

Bourbeaux
Skirmish at Buzzard's Prairie (Chretien Point Plantation), October 15, 1863

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Sunday, November 21, 2010

Last Words from a Texan Killed in Louisiana

Letters belonging to Captain William Jackson Spurlock, Co. D of Spaight's Battalion (11th Texas Infantry). Spurlock was living in Tyler, Texas when the war started. He enlisted in December and his military career ended at the Battle of Fordoche Bridge (Sterling Plantation), Louisiana, on September 29, 1863. Spurlock wrote an additional letter that can be found at the 11th Texas Battalion Reenactors' site.



    Letter From Captain Spurlock to his Mother

    Camp Burton, La
    Sept. the 23rd 1863

    Dear Mother,

    I received your letter of the 6th of the present and you may be well assured that I was glad to hear from you
    again though sorry to hear that you was not well, you also said that Sylvester had been sick which I was
    sorry to hear though glad to hear that he was mending.Your letter found me up and about, I have had the
    yellow jaundice but it did not hurt me very bad. We are now encamped at the Atachyalya Bayou at what point
    known in this part of the world as Morgans Ferry twelve miles from the Mississippi River, it has been expected
    that this would be an ingagement here, but I believe at present that all fears are relieved upon that point. Our
    pickets are fighting with that of the Yankee's daily and at one time they came so near that our Artilery upon the
    enemys advance pickets they returned the fire but withdrew soon without doing any danger to us. We are daily
    drawn up in line of battle or for the first three or four days after our arrival at the present encampment. It is the
    opinion of most of the officers that we will shortly move up in the direction of Alexander to join the forces of the
    Trans-Miss Department, we hear various reports about the movement of the enemy we are in receipt of the news
    of the battle at Sabine Pa, and its success, we also heard but we now hear to the contrary that the enemy made
    another advance and succeeded in capturing the place and was concentrating a large force and was preparing
    for an invasion of the state

    (the lower part of the remainder of the letter torn off).

    Above letter written by Capt. William Jackson Spurlock of Company D, Spaight's (11th) Battalion, Texas
    Volunteer Cavalry and Infantry, to his mother, Rebecca Hooks Spurlock, six days before he was killed at
    Fordoche Bayou, LA on Sept 29, 1863.




1 comment:

  1. Good afternoon,

    I'm a relative of W.J. Spurlock and I'm actually writing a small bio of him for a local publication. If you'd be willing to share any information, I'd be more than happy to hear from you. I also have some documents and photos that you might be interested in seeing.

    ReplyDelete

Coppens' Zouave Battalion

Coppens' Zouave Battalion
Lt. Colonel George Coppens (seated) and brother, Captain Marie Alfred Coppens.Image sold at auction on Cowan Auctions, for $14,375