LOUISIANA IN THE CIVIL WAR

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SCOPE & CONTENT

The goal of Louisiana in the Civil War is to provide an online resource of information and links to our great state's involvement in the war. Topics expected to be commonly covered are: Battles fought in Louisiana, battles that Louisianians participated in, unit histories, rosters, uniforms and equipment of Louisiana soldiers, personalities to include not only the leadership of the state and armies but the common soldier, flags and resources to research/read on the state's role in the war.



Louisiana in the Civil War strongly supports the input of the Civil War community. Submissions of stories, information, etc. are welcome and full credit will be given for what we share.

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Bourbeaux

Bourbeaux
Skirmish at Buzzard's Prairie (Chretien Point Plantation), October 15, 1863

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Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Louisiana Tigers Outdone?

This story from the New York Times was brought our way courtesy of Terry Jones. Dr. Jones makes a very interesting oberservation regarding the story: "I find it interesting he did not feel it necessary to explain who the Louisiana Tigers were--apparently all Northerners were familiar with them."


New York Times, February 18, 1863


The Indians have had quite enough of rebel rule during the past two years; and from what we have recently learned from a leading man among the Cherokees, we have no doubt they will now joyfully return to the protection of the Union. They have probably suffered as much from the rebellion as the people of any State or region in the whole land. Many of them were loyal, and the drunken rebel savages under Pike set upon such with a fury and ferocity which could not be surpassed by Louisiana "Tigers." Villages were burnt down, farms broken up, women and children tortured and killed, and thousands, literally thousands, driven into exile in Kansas.


Drunken rebel savages, fury and ferocity could not be surpassed by Louisiana "Tigers." It seems the reputation the Louisiana soldiers established within the Confederate army was notorious across the lines. The writer was wanting to establish just how horrible the men under General Albert Pike and used a comparison to the Tigers to make his point.

2 comments:

  1. Albert Pike led Confederate Indians. Those would be some old guys if they were Zebulon Pike vets!

    ReplyDelete
  2. OOPS! Thank you Drew! Albert has been given credit :)

    ReplyDelete

Coppens' Zouave Battalion

Coppens' Zouave Battalion
Lt. Colonel George Coppens (seated) and brother, Captain Marie Alfred Coppens.Image sold at auction on Cowan Auctions, for $14,375